EAM & CMMS Systems, 10 times more data in the system or 10 time less done with the data available?

 

The road to success in using information systems is a difficult one to navigate. When an implementation of a system is started some assumptions are made about what is needed from the system, how it will help with decision-making, how it will help with execution  of maintenance activities and many other factors. The maintenance environment is a complex environment to begin with, then on top of that it is an environment that is constantly presenting itself with new challenges and changing operational conditions. The markets change as well as many other external factors, the knowledge is leaving from the manufacturing environment because of aging workforce as well as more competition for the remaining workforce with knowledge and experience and the list could go on and on.

At the core of information systems is the gathering of data, it needs to be reliable data so that the decisions from that data are based on solid foundation. Without reliable data the decisions made can not be reliable. The way data is collected is extremely important, wherever there is manual input you are introducing an element of risk for mistakes being made. Wherever the data is collected automatically there is an element of failure or calibration error introduced in the collection process. There are also many other factors that are necessary to remain vigilant about.

To answer the question headed in the Blog, today we have the capabilities to store extreme amounts of data in our systems and databases. So too much data is probably not an issue in most cases. Navigating through that data can be challenging but the most important thing about the data should be that it needs to be reliable and accurate! If there is too little done with the data, probably in most cases it is possible to improve how the data is being used. In helping with good quality decision-making it takes time and a lot of thoughts to develop, it is an investment that can be quick to return a profit.

I hope that you have enjoyed the read and if you have any comments or questions please don’t be shy to post them below or contact me directly. Thank you for reading and hopefully sharing.

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“Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” – Albert Einstein

Tunnel VisionSome might wonder why my blog this time has a header with a quote from Albert Einstein. The reason is that lately I have been extremely busy and a lot of pressure put from many sources, this is just the normal environment of a Maintenance & Reliability professional.

However it is important to not forget to take a step back from the logic of our existence where we solve problems, implement better practices and processes, etc. in a logical way every day. These logical functions that we deliver makes us have a bit of a tunnel vision, like the horse that is pulling the wagon with the blinds on so he does not get distracted.

Stepping back and Imagining where we could go, what we could do better, how we can deliver better results, what we can learn from anything and use it in our Reliability & Maintenance practices. Only focusing on the problems we are in without looking around for opportunities can make us miss some extremely great opportunities.

Only focusing on the problem of being stuck in the snow far from everybody in the middle of the mountain

Could make us miss the opportunities that are all around us, the beautiful views, the nature... and of course the people around that could help out 🙂

So in the heat of the game of finding the very best Reliability & Maintenance practices don’t forget to take a step back, relax and imagine… because Imagination will take you everywhere.

Another good quote from Albert Einstein is : “Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.

But more on that later, I hope you have a great Imaginative rest of the weekend and don’t forget to comment 🙂

Warm regards, Bjarni Ellert Ísleifsson, CMRP

Data in Maintenance & Reliability

Since my studies in Manchester University, where I studied MSC in Maintenance Engineering & Asset Management, I have always been interested by Data and how we tend to use it to further our Maintenance & Reliability processes.

My MSc thesis titled: “Data collection and its use to advance maintenance management and maintenance practices to support business objectives” discusses it in great details.

So why post a little blog about it? Well, I wanted to get a discussion going about the three main focus areas once you have decided what data to collect.

1. Data collection systems: How can we effectively use them for our benefits? The systems are many and the data is of various natures. There are for example the graphs from our vibration program, the thermal images from our IR program, a lot of statistical data from various systems like ERP, EAM, CMMS, Cost & Profit from accounting data systems… and the list can be quite long. With all of those systems how can we collect all the data and send it to the Data processing systems to be processed effectively and efficiently?

2. Data processing systems: These systems can vary in nature and function. Usually these systems are as many as our techniques to collect data. To effectively process the data it is a key factor to gather the data in a perfectly uniform way. This can be challenging to do and we will need great work processes to be able to get this right.

3. Information output systems: The quality of the results depends greatly first on the quality and amount of the data collected, secondly on the way we process the data and finally on how we interpret the information that comes out of the information output systems. It is crucial for the quality of the decisions made to have the data uniformly collected, processed and put out of the information systems.

In conclusion, it is a three-step process:
1. Collect the data.
2. Process the data.
3. Output information.

After these three steps we will need to make decisions that benefit our Maintenance & Reliability process and the positive effect of those decisions will depend greatly on the quality and uniformity of each step in the process. 

Data collection systems - Data processing systems - Information output systems

Data collection systems - Data processing systems - Information output systems

I would appreciate all of your comments and discussions here below, thank you for your time and interest in my Blog.